Constructed in 1872, Central Synagogue is the oldest building in continuous use as a synagogue in New York. Remarkable for its Moorish design and ornate interior, it is both a New York City Landmark and a National Historic Landmark.   In 1998, the Synagogue was severely damaged by fire.  Our team worked closely with the congregation to perform a comprehensive renovation to restore and preserve the building’s historic character and allow the building to better serve contemporary needs.   Among the most significant aspects of the restoration was the repainting of the geometrical, multi-colored stencil patterns and cleaning and restoration of the sanctuary’s clerestory windows, rose window, stained-glass laylights, and its 12 double-story stained-glass windows.  A section of moveable pews, fabricated in a style evocative of the original’s detailed millwork, allows flexible styles of services and brings the congregants closer to the clergy, a request from Rabbi Peter Rubenstein.   In a new lower level, a multi-purpose space accommodates a variety of public functions and provides an elegant event rental space.  On the exterior, ornamental details     missing for decades were re-created. We brought back the black-and-red slate geometric pattern to the gabled roof and accented the crenellations around the twin minaret towers with gold leaf.  The main entrance was reconfigured to create a grand entryway that more effectively balances the flow of congregants
       
     
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 Constructed in 1872, Central Synagogue is the oldest building in continuous use as a synagogue in New York. Remarkable for its Moorish design and ornate interior, it is both a New York City Landmark and a National Historic Landmark.   In 1998, the Synagogue was severely damaged by fire.  Our team worked closely with the congregation to perform a comprehensive renovation to restore and preserve the building’s historic character and allow the building to better serve contemporary needs.   Among the most significant aspects of the restoration was the repainting of the geometrical, multi-colored stencil patterns and cleaning and restoration of the sanctuary’s clerestory windows, rose window, stained-glass laylights, and its 12 double-story stained-glass windows.  A section of moveable pews, fabricated in a style evocative of the original’s detailed millwork, allows flexible styles of services and brings the congregants closer to the clergy, a request from Rabbi Peter Rubenstein.   In a new lower level, a multi-purpose space accommodates a variety of public functions and provides an elegant event rental space.  On the exterior, ornamental details     missing for decades were re-created. We brought back the black-and-red slate geometric pattern to the gabled roof and accented the crenellations around the twin minaret towers with gold leaf.  The main entrance was reconfigured to create a grand entryway that more effectively balances the flow of congregants
       
     

Constructed in 1872, Central Synagogue is the oldest building in continuous use as a synagogue in New York. Remarkable for its Moorish design and ornate interior, it is both a New York City Landmark and a National Historic Landmark. 

In 1998, the Synagogue was severely damaged by fire.  Our team worked closely with the congregation to perform a comprehensive renovation to restore and preserve the building’s historic character and allow the building to better serve contemporary needs. 

Among the most significant aspects of the restoration was the repainting of the geometrical, multi-colored stencil patterns and cleaning and restoration of the sanctuary’s clerestory windows, rose window, stained-glass laylights, and its 12 double-story stained-glass windows.

A section of moveable pews, fabricated in a style evocative of the original’s detailed millwork, allows flexible styles of services and brings the congregants closer to the clergy, a request from Rabbi Peter Rubenstein. 

In a new lower level, a multi-purpose space accommodates a variety of public functions and provides an elegant event rental space.

On the exterior, ornamental details     missing for decades were re-created. We brought back the black-and-red slate geometric pattern to the gabled roof and accented the crenellations around the twin minaret towers with gold leaf.  The main entrance was reconfigured to create a grand entryway that more effectively balances the flow of congregants

central synagogue ext elevation 2 L.jpg
       
     
central synagogue int sanctuary bird L.jpg
       
     
central synagogue int sanctuary 3 L.jpg
       
     
005.jpg
       
     
central synagogue int ark 1 L.jpg
       
     
central synagogue int gallery 5 L.jpg
       
     
central synagogue int ark 2 L.jpg
       
     
central synagogue int organ loft 1 L.jpg
       
     
central synagogue int ceiling L.jpg
       
     
central synagogue int gallery 1 L.jpg
       
     
central synagogue int gallery 3 L.jpg
       
     
central synagogue int stencil dtl L.jpg
       
     
central synagogue int stencil dtl 1 L.jpg